Glasgow Snatch Late Heineken Cup Victory

Glasgow 13, Bourgoin 12Glasgow took revenge at Hughenden tonight. Defeat in Bourgoin on Sunday was answered with victory. But it was far too close for comfort. In a nerve-wracking finale, deep into added time, Calvin Howarth kicked the winning penalty goal that kept Glasgow in the hunt for a Heineken Cup quarter-final place.That, though, was only a mere outline sketch of the decisive circumstances. The final act was coloured in yellow and red cards.Glenn Metcalfe, already the only try-scorer of the contest, had taken Glasgow within touching distance of the goal-line. The subsequent assault on the French defence was fierce and furious, and just as it seemed that Glasgow would be thwarted by Bourgoin stubbornness the Italian referee, Giulio de Santis, decided that he had had enough.He had already had two French forwards in the sin-bin for killing the ball, he had warned Bourgoin that he would tolerate no more, and when Thibault Mazet transgressed that was it. The red card came out. Mazet had been on the field as replacement for less than quarter of an hour, but he paid the penalty of the team's persistent infringement.It was right in front of the posts. The kick was barn-door range, and Calvin Howarth slotted it.Afterwards, Phillippe Saint-Andre, the Bourgoin team manager, was furious about that decision. But Kiwi Searancke, Glasgow's coach, summed up the view of those who could stand back and consider clearly the logic and sense of the red card. His message was simple - those who kill the ball will kill the game.Victory for Glasgow was deserved. They had played at times with persistence, pace, pugnacity, and passion. The win would have been more comfortable and certainly not so narrow and belated if their goal-kicks had gone over. Tommy Hayes missed three penalties and Howarth two - 15 points went begging.Alexandre Peclier and Hayes traded penalty goals in the first eight minutes. It was then that Hayes missed two, but he still paid his way with his facility to work the ball wide with pace. Glasgow aimed not to be drawn into too much of the close-quarter conflict that Bourgoin seemed to prefer. It was a game designed for Metcalfe and Andy Henderson to test the midfield in company with supporting forwards such as Gordon Bulloch, Glasgow's captain celebrating his 100th game for the team, and Gordon Simpson.Glasgow also had themselves well organised in defence. It was their intention not to be suckered as they had been by Bourgoin's three tries in the first 35 minutes of the away game on Sunday. Eremodo Tuni was especially well policed, allowed barely a hint of the space that he had exploited with two tries five days earlier.Instead, it was Glasgow who scored what was to be the only try of the game, while Bourgoin were short-handed with Lionel Nallet in the sin-bin. Jon Steel had a go at the right corner, denied only by Jeff Coux's tackle. But Bourgoin messed up their lineout throw, Simpson pinched the ball, and the swift feed from the ruck there to the left created the space wide out. A long pass from Hayes helped to open the way for Metcalfe to slice through, proof that he readily adapting to his new role at outside centre.Though well out on the left, Hayes slotted the conversion. He missed another penalty in first-half added time, but Glasgow still had a 10-3 lead at the interval.They ought to have finished Bourgoin off barely 10 minutes into the second half after Gordon Bulloch's initial thrust from a free kick sparked a searing break by Hayes from the French 10-metre line deep into the 22. But the chance foundered when they lost the subsequent penalty lineout.Instead of being at least a dozen points clear, Glasgow lost their composure and their togetherness, though only slightly. Yet it was enough for Bourgoin to claw their way back with three penalty goals from Peclier. For the third of those, Peclier himself had opened the door with a kick and gather, and it was only deep in the home 22 that the supporting Pierre Caillet was stifled.Howarth took over from Hayes as stand-off after an hour, and he, too, missed goals. But with little more than 10 minutes left, Bourgoin suffered another yellow card. This time Pierre Raschi was the culprit.Glasgow sought to exploit the advantage as they had done late in the first half, and Metcalfe all but scored again, the centre denied only inches from the line. It was in the consequent assault that Mazet was dismissed, and Howarth kicked the winning penalty goal. Later in the night the match commissioner ruled that the sending-off was enough of a penalty for Mazet.Glasgow's Heineken campaign will resume next month with a visit to Sale and home game against Llanelli. Nothing less than victory in both games is needed if Glasgow are to reach the last eight.Glasgow - Stuart Moffat; Jon Steel, Glenn Metcalfe, Andrew Henderson, Roland Reid; Tommy Hayes, Graeme Beveridge; David Hilton, Gordon Bulloch (captain), Lee Harrison, Nathan Ross, Andrew Hall, Gordon Simpson, Andrew Wilson, Jon Petrie. Substitutes - Andrew Kelly for Hilton (32 minutes to half-time), Calvin Howarth for Hayes (59), Donnie Macfadyen for Simpson (59), Kelly for Hilton (61), Alan Bulloch for Moffat (65).Try, Metcalfe; conversion, Hayes; penalty goals, Hayes, Howarth.Bourgoin - Benjamin Boyet; Eremodo Tuni, Glenn Davis, David Venditti, Jeff Coux; Alexandre Peclier, Mickael Forest; Olivier Milloud, Djawad Djoudi, Pascal Peyron, Pascal Pape, Lionel Nallet (captain), Julien Bonnaire, Alexandre Bias, Pierre Raschi. Substitutes - Thibault Mazet for Milloud (7-11), Norm Berryman for Davis (61), Pierre Caillet for Pape (65), Mazet for Milloud (67). Yellow cards - Nallet, Raschi. Red card - Mazet.Penalty goals, Peclier (4).Referee - Giulio de Santis (Italy).Glasgow 13, Bourgoin 12Glasgow took revenge at Hughenden tonight. Defeat in Bourgoin on Sunday was answered with victory. But it was far too close for comfort. In a nerve-wracking finale, deep into added time, Calvin Howarth kicked the winning penalty goal that kept Glasgow in the hunt for a Heineken Cup quarter-final place.That, though, was only a mere outline sketch of the decisive circumstances. The final act was coloured in yellow and red cards.Glenn Metcalfe, already the only try-scorer of the contest, had taken Glasgow within touching distance of the goal-line. The subsequent assault on the French defence was fierce and furious, and just as it seemed that Glasgow would be thwarted by Bourgoin stubbornness the Italian referee, Giulio de Santis, decided that he had had enough.He had already had two French forwards in the sin-bin for killing the ball, he had warned Bourgoin that he would tolerate no more, and when Thibault Mazet transgressed that was it. The red card came out. Mazet had been on the field as replacement for less than quarter of an hour, but he paid the penalty of the team's persistent infringement.It was right in front of the posts. The kick was barn-door range, and Calvin Howarth slotted it.Afterwards, Phillippe Saint-Andre, the Bourgoin team manager, was furious about that decision. But Kiwi Searancke, Glasgow's coach, summed up the view of those who could stand back and consider clearly the logic and sense of the red card. His message was simple - those who kill the ball will kill the game.Victory for Glasgow was deserved. They had played at times with persistence, pace, pugnacity, and passion. The win would have been more comfortable and certainly not so narrow and belated if their goal-kicks had gone over. Tommy Hayes missed three penalties and Howarth two - 15 points went begging.Alexandre Peclier and Hayes traded penalty goals in the first eight minutes. It was then that Hayes missed two, but he still paid his way with his facility to work the ball wide with pace. Glasgow aimed not to be drawn into too much of the close-quarter conflict that Bourgoin seemed to prefer. It was a game designed for Metcalfe and Andy Henderson to test the midfield in company with supporting forwards such as Gordon Bulloch, Glasgow's captain celebrating his 100th game for the team, and Gordon Simpson.Glasgow also had themselves well organised in defence. It was their intention not to be suckered as they had been by Bourgoin's three tries in the first 35 minutes of the away game on Sunday. Eremodo Tuni was especially well policed, allowed barely a hint of the space that he had exploited with two tries five days earlier.Instead, it was Glasgow who scored what was to be the only try of the game, while Bourgoin were short-handed with Lionel Nallet in the sin-bin. Jon Steel had a go at the right corner, denied only by Jeff Coux's tackle. But Bourgoin messed up their lineout throw, Simpson pinched the ball, and the swift feed from the ruck there to the left created the space wide out. A long pass from Hayes helped to open the way for Metcalfe to slice through, proof that he readily adapting to his new role at outside centre.Though well out on the left, Hayes slotted the conversion. He missed another penalty in first-half added time, but Glasgow still had a 10-3 lead at the interval.They ought to have finished Bourgoin off barely 10 minutes into the second half after Gordon Bulloch's initial thrust from a free kick sparked a searing break by Hayes from the French 10-metre line deep into the 22. But the chance foundered when they lost the subsequent penalty lineout.Instead of being at least a dozen points clear, Glasgow lost their composure and their togetherness, though only slightly. Yet it was enough for Bourgoin to claw their way back with three penalty goals from Peclier. For the third of those, Peclier himself had opened the door with a kick and gather, and it was only deep in the home 22 that the supporting Pierre Caillet was stifled.Howarth took over from Hayes as stand-off after an hour, and he, too, missed goals. But with little more than 10 minutes left, Bourgoin suffered another yellow card. This time Pierre Raschi was the culprit.Glasgow sought to exploit the advantage as they had done late in the first half, and Metcalfe all but scored again, the centre denied only inches from the line. It was in the consequent assault that Mazet was dismissed, and Howarth kicked the winning penalty goal. Later in the night the match commissioner ruled that the sending-off was enough of a penalty for Mazet.Glasgow's Heineken campaign will resume next month with a visit to Sale and home game against Llanelli. Nothing less than victory in both games is needed if Glasgow are to reach the last eight.Glasgow - Stuart Moffat; Jon Steel, Glenn Metcalfe, Andrew Henderson, Roland Reid; Tommy Hayes, Graeme Beveridge; David Hilton, Gordon Bulloch (captain), Lee Harrison, Nathan Ross, Andrew Hall, Gordon Simpson, Andrew Wilson, Jon Petrie. Substitutes - Andrew Kelly for Hilton (32 minutes to half-time), Calvin Howarth for Hayes (59), Donnie Macfadyen for Simpson (59), Kelly for Hilton (61), Alan Bulloch for Moffat (65).Try, Metcalfe; conversion, Hayes; penalty goals, Hayes, Howarth.Bourgoin - Benjamin Boyet; Eremodo Tuni, Glenn Davis, David Venditti, Jeff Coux; Alexandre Peclier, Mickael Forest; Olivier Milloud, Djawad Djoudi, Pascal Peyron, Pascal Pape, Lionel Nallet (captain), Julien Bonnaire, Alexandre Bias, Pierre Raschi. Substitutes - Thibault Mazet for Milloud (7-11), Norm Berryman for Davis (61), Pierre Caillet for Pape (65), Mazet for Milloud (67). Yellow cards - Nallet, Raschi. Red card - Mazet.Penalty goals, Peclier (4).Referee - Giulio de Santis (Italy).