Glasgow'S Cup Victory At Bridgend

Celtic Warriors 9, Glasgow 19Victory, whatever the circumstances, is pleasant on the palate. It tastes all the better away from home. But Glasgow's victory against Celtic Warriors tonight was cordon bleu.It was not just a rarity for Scottish teams in Wales. It was, after all, a sudden-death contest - a knock-out game - a Celtic Cup tie. It was, too, Glasgow's first win in five visits to Bridgend's Brewery Field. Most savoury of all, though, it was an enjoyable feast to end a week when the team menu regularly had to be rewritten.Even earlier today the ingredients had to change. A couple of players, Richard McKnight and Rory McKay, had hurriedly to fly south to sit on the bench because Kenny Sinclair and Graeme Morrison were ruled out. Mark McMillan was promoted to starting scrum half, his debut in a competition game for Glasgow, and the threequarter line had to be rejigged.Yet out of such adversity rose a team performance that set the Welsh back on their heels. By no means was the Glasgow game perfect. But it had two vital elements. The defence was admirably secure - Warriors could not score even one try - and everyone played for the others. It was, truly, a team effort.Glasgow's telling surge was early in the second half. Tries by Cammy Mather and Calvin Howarth turned half-time equality into a 16-6 lead in the six minutes after the interval.Of course, modern marketing policy demands a man of the match. That honour went to Andy Hall. It was deserved, as it would have been if it had gone to any of several others, though none more than Sean Lamont, whose tackling had an extra dimension. Twice he not only stopped an opponent but he also broke from the hit with the ball.Overall, the Glasgow performance was not just streets ahead of their game in defeat by Ulster last week. It was the length of the M4 motorway and more ahead.Glasgow's scrummaging was sound, and as soon as the first signs of creaking appeared Euan Murray was sent on as replacement prop. The lineout, too, was more efficient that it had been in the Belfast match. Joe Beardshaw, making his competition debut for Glasgow, shared the touchline honours with Hall. All in all, Glasgow had a sound set-piece base.Added to that, another newcomer, McMillan, yapping on the forwards" heels, had a vigorously sound game. It was all the more creditable that he took the field as fourth-choice scrum half, a ranking that he undoubtedly challenged tonight after his promotion because Sinclair had not recovered from a head knock.McMillan's liaison with Calvin Howarth was mainly secure, and the threequarters worked as if they had practised together for weeks rather than being a unit reshuffled this morning, with Gareth Maclure switched from wing to replace Morrison at outside centre. The way Maclure adjusted to the role offers the Glasgow coaches more options as well as adding to his onfield c.v.Even though the first half ended in deadlock, with two penalty goals by Neil Jenkins followed by a pair in kind by Calvin Howarth, the signs were favourable for Glasgow. The near-misses were at the Welsh end of the field.Between Warriors" two penalty goals Roland Reid broke out his own 22 on a thrust up the left as far as Warriors" 10-metre line. More ought to have come from that, with Jon Steel twice involved in the subsequent threats on the right.Then, after Warriors had gone to 6-0, Alan Bulloch's break, with support from Simon Gunn and Hall, unleashed continuity from Beardshaw, Hall again, and Steel before Howarth kicked his first penalty goal in 28 minutes.Lamont, latching on to an interception, then sprinted out of the Glasgow 22, and he would have gone all the way before for Aisea Havili's saving tackle close to the home goal-line. That escape, however, sparked an immediate counter. McMillan had to cover deep to save. Gunn was offside there, but Jenkins missed the penalty.Howarth soon equalised with his second penalty goal, and just before the half-time whistle McMillan was only inches short of a try. The scrum half, trying to dive in from the forwards" lineout drive, was denied by Cory Harris.After barely a minute of the second half, after Steel's threat on the right, Lamont's break sent Mather in to put Glasgow ahead for the first time. Then a long phase of patient, persistent continuity laid on the opportunity for Howarth to accelerate past two opponents for a try. That was 16-6, and even with more than half an hour before the end it was looking good for Glasgow.Jenkins cut the margin after an hour with his third penalty goal, but less than two minutes later Glasgow restored their 10-point lead. Howarth kicked ahead, Maclure followed up so vigorously that Warriors had to concede a penalty, and Howarth slotted his third goal.By then, Glasgow were regularly sending on substitutes, among them Daniel Parks, the Australian stand-off making his debut. Just about his first act was to drive a long, diagonal kick to turn the opposition. It was another statement that Glasgow had the game under control.Glasgow's opponents in the quarter-finals will be known early tomorrow evening. The seven options are Edinburgh, Leinster, Ulster, Munster, Connacht, Cardiff, and the winners of the Llanelli v Gwent Dragons match today.Leinster and Connacht, like Glasgow, won through this evening. Their respective victories were against Neath-Swansea Ospreys and The Borders.Celtic Warriors - Matthew Nuthall; Gareth Wyatt, Sean James, David Bishop, Aisea Havili; Neil Jenkins, Paul John; Phil Booth, Andrew Joy, Martyn Jones, Ryan Jones, Nathan Budgett, Richard Parks, Richard Bryan (captain), Cory Harris. Substitutes - Mark Lewis for Parks (12-25 and 72), Chris Horsman for Booth (47), Deiniol Jones for Ryan Jones (47).Penalty goals - Jenkins (3).Glasgow - Stuart Moffat; Jon Steel, Gareth Maclure, Alan Bulloch, Sean Lamont; Calvin Howarth, Mark McMillan; Andrew Kelly, Simon Gunn, Lee Harrison, Andrew Hall, Joe Beardshaw, Cameron Mather (captain), Roland Reid, Andrew Wilson. Substitutes - Paul Dearlove for Reid (half-time), Euan Murray for Kelly (59), Scott Lawson for Gunn (62), Daniel Parks for Howarth (64), Nathan Ross for Hall (78). Replacements not used - Rory McKay and Richard McKnight.Tries, Mather, Howarth; penalty goals, Howarth (3).Referee - Alan Lewis (Ireland).Celtic Warriors 9, Glasgow 19Victory, whatever the circumstances, is pleasant on the palate. It tastes all the better away from home. But Glasgow's victory against Celtic Warriors tonight was cordon bleu.It was not just a rarity for Scottish teams in Wales. It was, after all, a sudden-death contest - a knock-out game - a Celtic Cup tie. It was, too, Glasgow's first win in five visits to Bridgend's Brewery Field. Most savoury of all, though, it was an enjoyable feast to end a week when the team menu regularly had to be rewritten.Even earlier today the ingredients had to change. A couple of players, Richard McKnight and Rory McKay, had hurriedly to fly south to sit on the bench because Kenny Sinclair and Graeme Morrison were ruled out. Mark McMillan was promoted to starting scrum half, his debut in a competition game for Glasgow, and the threequarter line had to be rejigged.Yet out of such adversity rose a team performance that set the Welsh back on their heels. By no means was the Glasgow game perfect. But it had two vital elements. The defence was admirably secure - Warriors could not score even one try - and everyone played for the others. It was, truly, a team effort.Glasgow's telling surge was early in the second half. Tries by Cammy Mather and Calvin Howarth turned half-time equality into a 16-6 lead in the six minutes after the interval.Of course, modern marketing policy demands a man of the match. That honour went to Andy Hall. It was deserved, as it would have been if it had gone to any of several others, though none more than Sean Lamont, whose tackling had an extra dimension. Twice he not only stopped an opponent but he also broke from the hit with the ball.Overall, the Glasgow performance was not just streets ahead of their game in defeat by Ulster last week. It was the length of the M4 motorway and more ahead.Glasgow's scrummaging was sound, and as soon as the first signs of creaking appeared Euan Murray was sent on as replacement prop. The lineout, too, was more efficient that it had been in the Belfast match. Joe Beardshaw, making his competition debut for Glasgow, shared the touchline honours with Hall. All in all, Glasgow had a sound set-piece base.Added to that, another newcomer, McMillan, yapping on the forwards" heels, had a vigorously sound game. It was all the more creditable that he took the field as fourth-choice scrum half, a ranking that he undoubtedly challenged tonight after his promotion because Sinclair had not recovered from a head knock.McMillan's liaison with Calvin Howarth was mainly secure, and the threequarters worked as if they had practised together for weeks rather than being a unit reshuffled this morning, with Gareth Maclure switched from wing to replace Morrison at outside centre. The way Maclure adjusted to the role offers the Glasgow coaches more options as well as adding to his onfield c.v.Even though the first half ended in deadlock, with two penalty goals by Neil Jenkins followed by a pair in kind by Calvin Howarth, the signs were favourable for Glasgow. The near-misses were at the Welsh end of the field.Between Warriors" two penalty goals Roland Reid broke out his own 22 on a thrust up the left as far as Warriors" 10-metre line. More ought to have come from that, with Jon Steel twice involved in the subsequent threats on the right.Then, after Warriors had gone to 6-0, Alan Bulloch's break, with support from Simon Gunn and Hall, unleashed continuity from Beardshaw, Hall again, and Steel before Howarth kicked his first penalty goal in 28 minutes.Lamont, latching on to an interception, then sprinted out of the Glasgow 22, and he would have gone all the way before for Aisea Havili's saving tackle close to the home goal-line. That escape, however, sparked an immediate counter. McMillan had to cover deep to save. Gunn was offside there, but Jenkins missed the penalty.Howarth soon equalised with his second penalty goal, and just before the half-time whistle McMillan was only inches short of a try. The scrum half, trying to dive in from the forwards" lineout drive, was denied by Cory Harris.After barely a minute of the second half, after Steel's threat on the right, Lamont's break sent Mather in to put Glasgow ahead for the first time. Then a long phase of patient, persistent continuity laid on the opportunity for Howarth to accelerate past two opponents for a try. That was 16-6, and even with more than half an hour before the end it was looking good for Glasgow.Jenkins cut the margin after an hour with his third penalty goal, but less than two minutes later Glasgow restored their 10-point lead. Howarth kicked ahead, Maclure followed up so vigorously that Warriors had to concede a penalty, and Howarth slotted his third goal.By then, Glasgow were regularly sending on substitutes, among them Daniel Parks, the Australian stand-off making his debut. Just about his first act was to drive a long, diagonal kick to turn the opposition. It was another statement that Glasgow had the game under control.Glasgow's opponents in the quarter-finals will be known early tomorrow evening. The seven options are Edinburgh, Leinster, Ulster, Munster, Connacht, Cardiff, and the winners of the Llanelli v Gwent Dragons match today.Leinster and Connacht, like Glasgow, won through this evening. Their respective victories were against Neath-Swansea Ospreys and The Borders.Celtic Warriors - Matthew Nuthall; Gareth Wyatt, Sean James, David Bishop, Aisea Havili; Neil Jenkins, Paul John; Phil Booth, Andrew Joy, Martyn Jones, Ryan Jones, Nathan Budgett, Richard Parks, Richard Bryan (captain), Cory Harris. Substitutes - Mark Lewis for Parks (12-25 and 72), Chris Horsman for Booth (47), Deiniol Jones for Ryan Jones (47).Penalty goals - Jenkins (3).Glasgow - Stuart Moffat; Jon Steel, Gareth Maclure, Alan Bulloch, Sean Lamont; Calvin Howarth, Mark McMillan; Andrew Kelly, Simon Gunn, Lee Harrison, Andrew Hall, Joe Beardshaw, Cameron Mather (captain), Roland Reid, Andrew Wilson. Substitutes - Paul Dearlove for Reid (half-time), Euan Murray for Kelly (59), Scott Lawson for Gunn (62), Daniel Parks for Howarth (64), Nathan Ross for Hall (78). Replacements not used - Rory McKay and Richard McKnight.Tries, Mather, Howarth; penalty goals, Howarth (3).Referee - Alan Lewis (Ireland).