Two Brilliant Tries Set Glasgow En Route To Victory

Glasgow 27, Ulster 25Two tries born of brilliance and bravado by Sean Lamont and Alan Bulloch late in the first half set Glasgow on the way to a Celtic League victory against Ulster at Hughenden this evening. Within a handful of minutes, with Calvin Howarth kicking three goals as well, an eight-point deficit was quickly turned into a 20-11 lead at half-time.It was a rare league victory for Glasgow, only their third of the season, and it was, too, an instance of a result that countered the teams" respective league positions. But at the end of an exciting, enthralling contest, one of the highlights of the season so far, the result changed neither the top nor the foot of the ladder. Ulster remained leaders whereas Glasgow stayed at the bottom, with The Borders keeping just ahead by beating Edinburgh.With half-time approaching, Ulster seemed to have taken a crucial lead at 11-3. But Howarth cut back with a penalty goal after obstruction on Lamont as the left wing chase his own kick up the left.Almost immediately Lamont was away again, sent off by Glenn Metcalfe from an Ulster kick to the home 22-metre line. The wing saw a gap, stepped up the pace, and sliced through. He kept on going all the way to the posts. For individualism, it was as good a try as anyone could score. It merited victory in its own right.Howarth added the conversion for a 13-11 lead, and as if that were not enough Rory Kerr struck with similar pace up the right wing. Bulloch was on hand for the inside pass to score, adding to his two tries against Cardiff a week ago. Again Howarth converted.Midway in the second half Scott Lawson ploughed through for Glasgow's third try after Metcalfe, chasing his own kick ahead, had trapped Neil Doak in possession. Glasgow swarmed up to turn the screws before the hooker scored.Lawson's try capped what was undoubtedly the young hooker's best game for Glasgow. He was persistent and vigorous, and he had the devil to take on anyone who stood in his way. He was the thoroughly deserved winner of the man-of-the-match award.Similarly, two of his fellow tight forwards, Joe Beardshaw and Nathan Ross, enjoyed the hefty cut and thrust of the close-quarter jousting. Farther out, Graeme Morrison's running was aggressive, and Metcalfe was full of enthusiasm.Those cameos were set against the background of mainly secure and solid defence that proved to be the foundation on which Glasgow built their victory. In that respect they were well tested early on. As early as the first minute Paul Steinmetz seemed to have scored a try, though the Ulster centre recalled because of a forward pass, and the only scores of the first quarter were three penalty goals, two by Adam Larkin bracketing one by Howarth.In that time, too, the Glasgow medics were kept busy. Jon Petrie, Morrison, and Graeme Beveridge were all off at various times for blood injuries.After 29 minutes, however, a penalty on halfway allowed Ulster to turn the screws more productively, though it seemed that Glasgow there were as much sinned against by obstruction. Whatever the right or wrong of the penalty, the subsequent pressure opened the way for Neil Best to score for an 11-3 lead.What followed in the five minutes before the interval was rugby of memorable quality. A team that can produce such tries should not be languishing so low in the league table.The third quarter of the contest was similar to the first, though without any scoring. But when Andy Ward was sin-binned for obstruction a quickly tapped penalty Glasgow had the scent of a winning thrust, and it seemed to have come with Lawson's try. Howarth's conversion stretched the lead to 27-11, more than two converted tries ahead.Back came Ulster, however, even before Ward's return. Matt McCullough drove over from his fellow forwards" concerted hammering on the Glasgow line. Paddy Wallace converted, and two minutes into added time Shane Stewart opened the door for Scott Young to convert.Wallace's conversion cut the margin to just two points, but Glasgow survived the last nervous couple of minutes. At the end the relief exploded into delirious pleasure.Glasgow - Glenn Metcalfe; Rory Kerr, Graeme Morrison,_Alan Bulloch,_Sean Lamont;_Calvin Howarth, Graeme Beveridge; Andrew Kelly, Scott Lawson, Euan Murray, Joe Beardshaw, Nathan Ross, Paul Dearlove, Jon Petrie (captain), Donnie Macfadyen. Substitutes - Roland Reid for Petrie (10-22 minutes), David Millard for Morrison (21-30), Sam Pinder for Beveridge (23-40), Lee Harrison for Kelly (60), Pinder for Beveridge (75). Replacements not used - Simon Gunn, Andrew Wilson, Colin Gregor.Tries, Lamont, Bulloch, Lawson; conversions, Howarth (3); penalty goals, Howarth (2).Ulster - Bryn Cunningham; James Topping, Paddy Wallace, Paul Steinmetz, Scott Young; Adam Larkin, Neil Doak; Robbie Kempson, Matt Sexton, Rod Moore, Gary Longwell, Matt McCullough, Andy Ward (captain), Roger Wilson, Neil Best. Substitutes - Paul Shields for Sexton (14), Shane Stewart for Larkin (55), Neil McMillan for Neil Best (55), Matt Mustchin for Longwell (59), Kieran Campbell for Doak (65). Replacements not used - Bryan Young, Seamus Mallon.Tries, Best, McCullough, Young; conversions, Wallace (2); penalty goals, Larkin (2).Referee - Nigel Owens (Wales).Attendance - 3189.Glasgow 27, Ulster 25Two tries born of brilliance and bravado by Sean Lamont and Alan Bulloch late in the first half set Glasgow on the way to a Celtic League victory against Ulster at Hughenden this evening. Within a handful of minutes, with Calvin Howarth kicking three goals as well, an eight-point deficit was quickly turned into a 20-11 lead at half-time.It was a rare league victory for Glasgow, only their third of the season, and it was, too, an instance of a result that countered the teams" respective league positions. But at the end of an exciting, enthralling contest, one of the highlights of the season so far, the result changed neither the top nor the foot of the ladder. Ulster remained leaders whereas Glasgow stayed at the bottom, with The Borders keeping just ahead by beating Edinburgh.With half-time approaching, Ulster seemed to have taken a crucial lead at 11-3. But Howarth cut back with a penalty goal after obstruction on Lamont as the left wing chase his own kick up the left.Almost immediately Lamont was away again, sent off by Glenn Metcalfe from an Ulster kick to the home 22-metre line. The wing saw a gap, stepped up the pace, and sliced through. He kept on going all the way to the posts. For individualism, it was as good a try as anyone could score. It merited victory in its own right.Howarth added the conversion for a 13-11 lead, and as if that were not enough Rory Kerr struck with similar pace up the right wing. Bulloch was on hand for the inside pass to score, adding to his two tries against Cardiff a week ago. Again Howarth converted.Midway in the second half Scott Lawson ploughed through for Glasgow's third try after Metcalfe, chasing his own kick ahead, had trapped Neil Doak in possession. Glasgow swarmed up to turn the screws before the hooker scored.Lawson's try capped what was undoubtedly the young hooker's best game for Glasgow. He was persistent and vigorous, and he had the devil to take on anyone who stood in his way. He was the thoroughly deserved winner of the man-of-the-match award.Similarly, two of his fellow tight forwards, Joe Beardshaw and Nathan Ross, enjoyed the hefty cut and thrust of the close-quarter jousting. Farther out, Graeme Morrison's running was aggressive, and Metcalfe was full of enthusiasm.Those cameos were set against the background of mainly secure and solid defence that proved to be the foundation on which Glasgow built their victory. In that respect they were well tested early on. As early as the first minute Paul Steinmetz seemed to have scored a try, though the Ulster centre recalled because of a forward pass, and the only scores of the first quarter were three penalty goals, two by Adam Larkin bracketing one by Howarth.In that time, too, the Glasgow medics were kept busy. Jon Petrie, Morrison, and Graeme Beveridge were all off at various times for blood injuries.After 29 minutes, however, a penalty on halfway allowed Ulster to turn the screws more productively, though it seemed that Glasgow there were as much sinned against by obstruction. Whatever the right or wrong of the penalty, the subsequent pressure opened the way for Neil Best to score for an 11-3 lead.What followed in the five minutes before the interval was rugby of memorable quality. A team that can produce such tries should not be languishing so low in the league table.The third quarter of the contest was similar to the first, though without any scoring. But when Andy Ward was sin-binned for obstruction a quickly tapped penalty Glasgow had the scent of a winning thrust, and it seemed to have come with Lawson's try. Howarth's conversion stretched the lead to 27-11, more than two converted tries ahead.Back came Ulster, however, even before Ward's return. Matt McCullough drove over from his fellow forwards" concerted hammering on the Glasgow line. Paddy Wallace converted, and two minutes into added time Shane Stewart opened the door for Scott Young to convert.Wallace's conversion cut the margin to just two points, but Glasgow survived the last nervous couple of minutes. At the end the relief exploded into delirious pleasure.Glasgow - Glenn Metcalfe; Rory Kerr, Graeme Morrison,_Alan Bulloch,_Sean Lamont;_Calvin Howarth, Graeme Beveridge; Andrew Kelly, Scott Lawson, Euan Murray, Joe Beardshaw, Nathan Ross, Paul Dearlove, Jon Petrie (captain), Donnie Macfadyen. Substitutes - Roland Reid for Petrie (10-22 minutes), David Millard for Morrison (21-30), Sam Pinder for Beveridge (23-40), Lee Harrison for Kelly (60), Pinder for Beveridge (75). Replacements not used - Simon Gunn, Andrew Wilson, Colin Gregor.Tries, Lamont, Bulloch, Lawson; conversions, Howarth (3); penalty goals, Howarth (2).Ulster - Bryn Cunningham; James Topping, Paddy Wallace, Paul Steinmetz, Scott Young; Adam Larkin, Neil Doak; Robbie Kempson, Matt Sexton, Rod Moore, Gary Longwell, Matt McCullough, Andy Ward (captain), Roger Wilson, Neil Best. Substitutes - Paul Shields for Sexton (14), Shane Stewart for Larkin (55), Neil McMillan for Neil Best (55), Matt Mustchin for Longwell (59), Kieran Campbell for Doak (65). Replacements not used - Bryan Young, Seamus Mallon.Tries, Best, McCullough, Young; conversions, Wallace (2); penalty goals, Larkin (2).Referee - Nigel Owens (Wales).Attendance - 3189.