Glasgow Denied By Last-Kick Goal

Glasgow 26, Munster 28In the space of little more than a minute Glasgow plummeted from the heights of elation to the depths of dejection at Hughenden this evening. A famous victory against one of European rugby's elite escaped from their grasp.Dan Parks had put Glasgow ahead at 26-25 with a penalty goal from more than 45 metres deep into added time. Victory was theirs if only they could control possession for less than a minute. But Glasgow failed to win the ball from the restart, and Munster did not look a gift horse in the mouth. They made sure that Ronan O"Gara had a shot at a drop goal, and the Munster stand-off is not one to miss such chances. He duly slotted it with the last kick of the Celtic League match.Munster not only won. They also took a bonus point by scoring four tries to two. Glasgow had a bonus point, too, from the narrow defeat.Despite that try count, Glasgow would have deserved victory if they had hung on for it. "If we'd won, it would have been a fair result," Hugh Campbell, Glasgow's head coach, remarked in the immediate aftermath. "We played a lot of the rugby."However, he added a caveat. "Lapses of concentration were costly," he pointed out.Not the least of those were Glasgow's failure to secure four restart kicks by Munster, three of them in the second half. Two of them allowed Munster to draw level at 13-all and then 20-20, and the last provided the means for O"Gara's winning goal.Even in defeat, however, Glasgow played their most refreshingly positive and aggressive rugby so far this season. Sean Lamont, Graeme Morrison, and Andrew Henderson had the devil in their game. Their efforts promoted eager support.Glasgow laid down the marker from the start, and after 20 minutes they ought to have been more than just 6-3 ahead with two Parks penalty goals bracketing one by O"Gara.Donnie Macfadyen did the groundwork for Glasgow's first after just two minutes. Lamont was denied a try in the left corner soon afterwards, and it was only ill-discipline that allowed O"Gara to respond with his first goal. Nigel Whitehouse had already awarded a scrummage to Glasgow outside their own 22 when he reverse the decision to penalise Andy Hall.But midway in the first half Lamont escaped when nothing seemed on over on the right. Kenny Logan linked, and Glasgow surged into the 22 through liaison by Lamont and Cammy Mather. It was there that Parks kicked his second goal.Seven minutes later Sam Pinder, even the opportunist, tapped a quick penalty just outside his own 22. He was partly obstructed by Munster's slow retreat, but Whitehouse played advantage, which was just as well. Lamont thrust through deep into the Munster half, and though he stumbled Macfadyen was up in support to run in from 30 metres. It was his third try in three successive matches.Parks converted, and Glasgow led 13-3. That was the least they deserved.Three minutes after that, however, Macfadyen was yellow-carded, seemingly for killing ball on the ground close to his own goal-line. Yet at that stage of the match Glasgow had been more sinned against than sinning in that respect. The two penalties that Parks had previously kicked had been for such infringements.Munster immediately exploited that numerical advantage with a try. But that was all that Glasgow allowed the visitors in 10 minutes of that sin-binning. Indeed, Glasgow might well have increased their lead while if they were short-handed if Morrison had not been taken out as he chased through on to a grubber kick by Parks in the Munster 22. Yet it did not draw a penalty.Immediately before the interval only a tackle by Pinder close to his own line denied his opposite number, Peter Stringer, a try off a driving maul. But Glasgow were not so sharp to cover after they had failed to secure the second half's kick-off. Christian Cullen intruded to run in at the right corner. For the second time O"Gara missed the conversion.Less than quarter of an hour later Glasgow regained the lead when Henderson broke through from a scrum close to the Munster line. Parks converted, but again Munster struck from the restart with a try by Anthony Horgan.O"Gara converted for 20-all, and Munster had the scent of victory when Cullen, supporting inside Shaun Payne, scored his second try. After 67 minutes the visitors were ahead for the first time. Here Graeme Beveridge, as Glasgow substitute scrum half, entered the contest for his hundredth appearance.Glasgow persisted, and Parks kicked two more penalty goals. Between them Morrison had to pull off a try-saving tackle on Payne. The second of those Parks goals regained the lead four minutes into added time, but another restart failure by Glasgow proved even more costly than the others as O"Gara responded with the winning drop goal.Glasgow - Rory Kerr; Kenny Logan, Graeme Morrison, Andrew Henderson, Sean Lamont; Dan Parks, Sam Pinder; Kevin Tkachuk, Gordon Bulloch, Lee Harrison, Andrew Hall, Dan Turner, Cammy Mather, Jon Petrie (captain), Donnie Macfadyen. Substitutes - Andrew Wilson for Mather (68), Graeme Beveridge for Pinder (68), John Beattie for Hall (81), Andrew Kelly for Harrison (81). Replacements not used - Scott Lawson, Calvin Howarth, Andy Craig.Tries, Macfadyen, Henderson; conversions, Parks (2); penalty goals, Parks (4).Munster - Christian Cullen; Shaun Payne, James Storey, Mike Mullins, Anthony Horgan; Ronan O"Gara, Peter Stringer; Marcus Horan, Frank Sheahan, John Hayes, Tom Bowman, Trevor Hogan, Alan Quinlan, Anthony Foley (captain), David Wallace. Substitutes - John Kelly for Storey (54), Denis Leamy for Wallace (69).Tries, Cullen (2), Sheahan, Horgan; conversion, O"Gara; penalty goal, O"Gara; drop goal, O"Gara.Referee - Nigel Whitehouse (Wales).Attendance - 2625.Glasgow 26, Munster 28In the space of little more than a minute Glasgow plummeted from the heights of elation to the depths of dejection at Hughenden this evening. A famous victory against one of European rugby's elite escaped from their grasp.Dan Parks had put Glasgow ahead at 26-25 with a penalty goal from more than 45 metres deep into added time. Victory was theirs if only they could control possession for less than a minute. But Glasgow failed to win the ball from the restart, and Munster did not look a gift horse in the mouth. They made sure that Ronan O"Gara had a shot at a drop goal, and the Munster stand-off is not one to miss such chances. He duly slotted it with the last kick of the Celtic League match.Munster not only won. They also took a bonus point by scoring four tries to two. Glasgow had a bonus point, too, from the narrow defeat.Despite that try count, Glasgow would have deserved victory if they had hung on for it. "If we'd won, it would have been a fair result," Hugh Campbell, Glasgow's head coach, remarked in the immediate aftermath. "We played a lot of the rugby."However, he added a caveat. "Lapses of concentration were costly," he pointed out.Not the least of those were Glasgow's failure to secure four restart kicks by Munster, three of them in the second half. Two of them allowed Munster to draw level at 13-all and then 20-20, and the last provided the means for O"Gara's winning goal.Even in defeat, however, Glasgow played their most refreshingly positive and aggressive rugby so far this season. Sean Lamont, Graeme Morrison, and Andrew Henderson had the devil in their game. Their efforts promoted eager support.Glasgow laid down the marker from the start, and after 20 minutes they ought to have been more than just 6-3 ahead with two Parks penalty goals bracketing one by O"Gara.Donnie Macfadyen did the groundwork for Glasgow's first after just two minutes. Lamont was denied a try in the left corner soon afterwards, and it was only ill-discipline that allowed O"Gara to respond with his first goal. Nigel Whitehouse had already awarded a scrummage to Glasgow outside their own 22 when he reverse the decision to penalise Andy Hall.But midway in the first half Lamont escaped when nothing seemed on over on the right. Kenny Logan linked, and Glasgow surged into the 22 through liaison by Lamont and Cammy Mather. It was there that Parks kicked his second goal.Seven minutes later Sam Pinder, even the opportunist, tapped a quick penalty just outside his own 22. He was partly obstructed by Munster's slow retreat, but Whitehouse played advantage, which was just as well. Lamont thrust through deep into the Munster half, and though he stumbled Macfadyen was up in support to run in from 30 metres. It was his third try in three successive matches.Parks converted, and Glasgow led 13-3. That was the least they deserved.Three minutes after that, however, Macfadyen was yellow-carded, seemingly for killing ball on the ground close to his own goal-line. Yet at that stage of the match Glasgow had been more sinned against than sinning in that respect. The two penalties that Parks had previously kicked had been for such infringements.Munster immediately exploited that numerical advantage with a try. But that was all that Glasgow allowed the visitors in 10 minutes of that sin-binning. Indeed, Glasgow might well have increased their lead while if they were short-handed if Morrison had not been taken out as he chased through on to a grubber kick by Parks in the Munster 22. Yet it did not draw a penalty.Immediately before the interval only a tackle by Pinder close to his own line denied his opposite number, Peter Stringer, a try off a driving maul. But Glasgow were not so sharp to cover after they had failed to secure the second half's kick-off. Christian Cullen intruded to run in at the right corner. For the second time O"Gara missed the conversion.Less than quarter of an hour later Glasgow regained the lead when Henderson broke through from a scrum close to the Munster line. Parks converted, but again Munster struck from the restart with a try by Anthony Horgan.O"Gara converted for 20-all, and Munster had the scent of victory when Cullen, supporting inside Shaun Payne, scored his second try. After 67 minutes the visitors were ahead for the first time. Here Graeme Beveridge, as Glasgow substitute scrum half, entered the contest for his hundredth appearance.Glasgow persisted, and Parks kicked two more penalty goals. Between them Morrison had to pull off a try-saving tackle on Payne. The second of those Parks goals regained the lead four minutes into added time, but another restart failure by Glasgow proved even more costly than the others as O"Gara responded with the winning drop goal.Glasgow - Rory Kerr; Kenny Logan, Graeme Morrison, Andrew Henderson, Sean Lamont; Dan Parks, Sam Pinder; Kevin Tkachuk, Gordon Bulloch, Lee Harrison, Andrew Hall, Dan Turner, Cammy Mather, Jon Petrie (captain), Donnie Macfadyen. Substitutes - Andrew Wilson for Mather (68), Graeme Beveridge for Pinder (68), John Beattie for Hall (81), Andrew Kelly for Harrison (81). Replacements not used - Scott Lawson, Calvin Howarth, Andy Craig.Tries, Macfadyen, Henderson; conversions, Parks (2); penalty goals, Parks (4).Munster - Christian Cullen; Shaun Payne, James Storey, Mike Mullins, Anthony Horgan; Ronan O"Gara, Peter Stringer; Marcus Horan, Frank Sheahan, John Hayes, Tom Bowman, Trevor Hogan, Alan Quinlan, Anthony Foley (captain), David Wallace. Substitutes - John Kelly for Storey (54), Denis Leamy for Wallace (69).Tries, Cullen (2), Sheahan, Horgan; conversion, O"Gara; penalty goal, O"Gara; drop goal, O"Gara.Referee - Nigel Whitehouse (Wales).Attendance - 2625.